Spend from Great Britain visitors to Ireland up by 18%

Tourists visiting Ireland from Great Britain spent €33 million more between January and March 2016 than in the same period in 2015, making a vast increase of 18%. In this period, British tourists were found to have spent €214 million in the first three months of 2016 compared to €181 million during the same period in 2015.

The year 2015 was also marked as a record-breaking year for tourism with 8.6 million trips to Ireland made.  Spending by British tourists to Ireland also increased by 18% in the first three months of 2016 compared to the same period in 2015, according to the Central Statistics Office.

Between 2010 and 2015, the number of tourists visiting Dublin city rose by 33%.

Between 2010 and 2015, the number of tourists visiting Dublin city rose by 33%.

Ireland’s capital city, Dublin was found to be the most visited location with the number of tourists visiting Dublin rising by 33 percent from 2010 to 2015.

The latest travel data by the CSO Office shows that increasing numbers of European and non-European tourists continue to make trips to Ireland with spending on the rise among all nationalities not just British tourists.

There was found to be an increase in the level of tourists from France, Germany, Italy, the US, Canada, Australia & New Zealand. Spending by these countries rose by €19 million in the first three months of 2016 compared to 2015. North Americans in particular were found to have spent €144 million in this time frame.  Overall the duration of visitor’s stays in Ireland remained the same with the majority of people from different countries staying for an average of 6.5 nights.

Overall the number of people taking a vacation in Ireland rose by more than 15% with 1,785 million trips in the first three months of 2016, up 254 million on 2015.

Be Sociable, Share!
This entry was posted in Activities in ireland, Best Attractions in Ireland, Best Places to visit in Ireland, Ireland, Ireland Travel, Ireland vacations, Ireland Vacations 2016, Irish History and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *